I came across this article on another photographers blog, but it’s really worth a read. The article is written by photographer, Scott Bourne and talks about how there is a war against photographers.

Who Started The War on Photography?, by Scott Bourne

Several photojournalists were injured or killed documenting the horror of Nine ­ Eleven. Many others risked their lives and their liberty to record the important story of that fateful day. It is the latter that particularly bothers me.

Several freelancers as well as some credentialed photojournalists were jailed for days without charge or trial in the days immediately after September 11… … Read More on Scott’s website…

This war extends to more then just news photographers. It extends to every one wanting to take photos in public. This war on photographers has spilled to schools and almost all major public buildings or events. It has helped mark any one with a camera as a terrorist or a pedophile.

Attorney, Bert Krages, “The Photographer’s Right“:

The right to take photographs in the United States is being challenged more than ever. People are being stopped, harassed, and even intimidated into handing over their personal property simply because they were taking photographs of subjects that made other people uncomfortable. Recent examples have included photographing industrial plants, bridges, buildings, trains, and bus stations. For the most part, attempts to restrict photography are based on misguided fears about the supposed dangers that unrestricted photography presents to society.

You can download Bret’s, The Photographer’s Right Pocket Guide.

As noted in the guide, despite  misconceptions to the contrary, the following subjects can almost always be photographed lawfully from public places:

  • Accident and Fire Scenes
  • Children
  • Celebrities
  • Bridges and Other Infrastructure
  • Residential and Commercial Buildings
  • Industrial Facilities and Public Utilities
  • Transportation Facilities (e.g., Airports, Train Stations)
  • Criminal Activities
  • Law Enforcement Officers
  • No one can ask for your film, memory card or equipment
  • Law enforcement officers may have the authority to seize film, memory card or equipment, when making an arrest  but otherwise must obtain a court order.
  • You are under no obligation to explain the purpose of your photography unless requested by a law enforcement officer.

Know your rights as a photographer!

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